K-Wave power blogger Gemma Wardle - “A Fat Girls’ Food Guide to Eating in Korea”



Korea is a world of fashion, culture, and most importantly, food. All sorts of delicious food, from Korean BBQ to tteokbokki.


But sometimes, even though you’re surrounded by delicious Korean food, you’ll crave a pizza and pasta, or a good butter chicken.


This was how I felt while I was in Korea for almost 2 months. I love Korean food but having grown up in Australia, I love all sorts of food.


I would often go around Gangnam or Myeongdong and look for places where I could non-Korean food. There were certainly a lot of options, but I didn’t know which places were good, and which ones to avoid. When I’m in Sydney, I take a look at what some of my favourite food bloggers recommend.


And if only I had discovered “A Fat Girls’ Food Guide to Eating in Korea”, the brainchild of English teacher turned full time blogger, Gemma Wardle.


The blog was started by Gemma to help expats like herself, find the foods they crave.


“When I first started, there really weren’t many places for expats” she said in an interview with Korean Safari.


But over the years, she’s seen the food scene change dramatically, with a huge increase in restaurants and cafes serving a diverse range of foods.


This isn’t your usual food blog about Korean food. It’s all about helping you navigate your way through the diverse food scene in Korea.


But of course, we had to find out what Gemma’s favourite Korean foods are.


“My favourite would probably be bulgogi and japchae”.


So any tips for people planning on travelling to Korea?


“Plan, plan, plan and just do lots and lots of research...Look into some of the soups or some of the sidedishes. Then when you go to the restaurants you won’t be scared to try them!”


The blog has been doing incredibly well. In fact, Gemma has now taken up full time blogging and writing, and will be venturing into other platforms, like YouTube videos.


Gemma shows the world the deliciousness that is Korea; but not just the Korean foods, rather, the diversity of food available.

Contributed by Harnsle Joo

©Korean Safari

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